ISSUE: MINIMUM WAGE & ECONOMIC GROWTH

Since top-down economic development strategies don’t work, why not try something really radical… something truly groundbreaking… and flip the script: economic development from the ground up.

Wait a minute… this isn’t a new idea. These are the kinds of programs FDR rolled out with his New Deal.

Most economists agree that, although WWII helped our economy recover, the war itself would not have been sufficient.

President Clinton’s former Labor Secretary, Robert Reich, was kind enough to look over my proposal to stimulate Michigan’s economy and confirmed that raising minimum wage to $12 per hour and repurposing tax revenue previously earmarked for corporate welfare to subsidize small-businesses for the added payroll burden would act as an economic stimulus.

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Question:
"I've heard that increasing minimum wage will lead to higher unemployment rates. Is this true?"

Answer: 
This argument has some merit, but not to the extent that big-business would like you to believe. 

There are a few key flaws to this logic.

For example, conservatives argue that this will lead to a greater use of automation and, therefore, increase unemployment. This suggests that corporations aren't already using automation as a cost saving measure.

Both large retailers in Greenville already have "self-checkout" options. Clearly, these were meant to replace workers. Furthermore, large-scale manufacturers don't pay their skilled trades workers minimum wage, so their costs payroll expenses won't go up unless low unemployment rates force them to pay more in order to attract high-quality workers.

...and none of us would complain about that, right?

The other error in thinking on this issue is the belief that businesses are, at this moment, holding on to more workers than they need, and that raising minimum wage would force them to let these "charity cases" go. That is, well, malarkey.